Researching vehicles for our oldest child {#sponsored}

It’s time. Time for a big step in our life. Time for a big step in our daughter’s life as she approaches adulthood. It’s time for us to start thinking about a car for our oldest who’s now in her senior year of high school and soon to attend the local college next year.

*Breathe, Farrah.
Everything will be ok, and she’ll be ok driving out there on the road of distracted drivers. At least she knows no phone use while driving and she’ll be home, just 10-15 minutes from school.
Breathe, Farrah.*

On a positive note, soon it will be time for my non-paid “uber” days to be reduced by at least one of my three children.

I remember my first car like it was yesterday. But then again, my teen years seem to be my most memorable even though it was over 20+ years ago. At the time I thought my car was the greatest. It was an electric blue ’92 Chevrolet Corsica that I helped my dad pick out and later inherited as my own about two years later. The inside was so “plushy”, and it fit all of my friends. I even had the old school GIANT SPACEY looking bag phone that didn’t last long in my possession after making calls just to make calls. But I also remember that it was very reliable, and the day that I, unfortunately, swerved to hit a deer on gravel back roads and totaled my baby, I learned that it was one of the safest. Had it not been for my dad’s research on safety and dependability, I would not be here today. The police officer even thought so at the accident site. He was quite surprised that the only scratch I got was from the bush my leg brushed up against as they pulled me out (my car spun and turned landing in a ditch sideways, and I was too short to climb out).

As a parent of multiple children, I need to save money where possible, and I don’t like wasting money when making big purchases like a vehicle.  Not only do I need to save money, but most importantly, I need to ensure that the vehicle purchased is a safe and dependable one that makes sense for our loved ones. I would be distraught with more grief knowing I put them into something that wouldn’t protect them should they’re ever in an accident. The chosen vehicle should be something that we would drive on a daily basis without worries.

I enjoy researching and learning new things. I like to compare things, and I like to hear what other consumers and experts have to say good and bad. The research process helps me make decisions that I hopefully won’t regret making later on. It was when I failed to do the pre-buying work that I’ve made a purchase I regretted. Like when I bought a Pontiac G6 a couple of years ago that came with issues I thought I could get over or fix later. That was the time my husband was right (*sigh*) at the get go to not buy it. But because I whined and insisted it was newer than the other options and looked “cute and sporty,” I ended up with the car from hell. All because I didn’t take the time to do all the pre-research. It was after purchasing that I found out that MANY had similar issues and all the pain they went through. All I can say is, lesson learned after being vehicle-less for about four months and thank goodness, I was able to get into something else far better after doing the needed research.

As I start the research process once again, it’s time not only to check out my trusty spots for reviews but to locate new and even improved ones. I do this EVERY time because years go by and models may change some over the years. What may have been great before, might not be as great as another depending on the year.

One online resource that I’ve recently been checking out during my research process is the cars.com site where I have access to their massive database of new and used cars for sale nationwide. Beneficial for both the buyer and the seller. I’m able to compare similar vehicles to help us find the right one with the most safety features. There are expert reviews available to read as well as some great tips and tools for car owners like myself as well as first-time buyers, so they don’t make the same mistakes many of us have done in the past. For those looking to help contribute to the U.S. economy or just want an American made vehicle, there’s an American-made index of vehicles that “analyzes a range of factors to determine which new cars and trucks contribute more to the U.S. economy, regardless of where the manufacturer’s brand is headquartered.”

Check it out for yourself. Use cars.com the next time you’re doing research on a vehicle you already own, looking to purchase, or hoping to sell soon.

Do you remember your first car?
If you helped buy your child’s first vehicle, what was it?

 

*Disclaimer: Even though this is a paid post part of a cars.com campaign,
any opinions stated above are my own.* 

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